Tag Archives: AMRUT

We are getting there

NITI Aayog has put forth a plan to turn India’s economy to reach a size of $7.5 trillion, (though targeting $10 trillion) or more than three times of what it is today, at $2 trillion. Implementation of GST, tax reform and ease of doing business (read the Cover Story) are all parts of the building blocks of this plan. And, they all seem to be moving on course so far. India is on the throes of a massive change. The change is not only limited to economy and industry but is also being instituted in social behaviour, and most importantly, in changing mindsets. Just look at what all is happening: Swachh Bharat, Digital India, Smart Cities, AMRUT, Affordable Housing, E-governance, E-Procurement, Make in India, Direct Benefit Transfer, Demonetisation, black money campaign, renewable energy thrust, UDAN, etc, and other social campaigns such as the Ujwala Yojna, Beti Bachao Beti Padhao and so on. This is a lot of work in so short a time and work is in progress.

The recently announced affordable housing scheme and Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana or PMAY have seen the launch of over 350 projects to build about 2 lakh houses with a private sector commitment of investing Rs 38,000 crore. The cost of constructing these units will be in the range of Rs 15 lakh to Rs 30 lakh with an average construction cost of Rs 18 lakh per house.

Under PMAY-U, central assistance is provided to each beneficiary in the range of Rs 1 lakh to Rs 2.35 lakh. Of the 2 lakh houses, over 1 lakh will be constructed in Maharashtra, followed by 41,921 houses in the NCR; 28,465 in Gujarat; 7,037 in Karnataka; and 6,055 in Uttar Pradesh; among others. Cement prices have already reached pre-demonetisation levels on the back of demand coming from infrastructure and will firm further due to these housing projects.

GST is on track and is likely to cause another disruption for a quarter, but will soon bring great prosperity. Distressed assets of around $6.8 trillion sitting on books of the banks would also heave a sigh of relief as firms and funds like KKR, Lone Star, Kotak and Edelweiss are planning to mobilise their resurrection. It is estimated by experts that the capital required for the next four to five years to resolve distressed situations is about Rs 30,000 crore to Rs 40,000 crore, and it is already being provided for by NBFCs, PEs and international funds.

The PM completes three years on May 26 this month and a lot is on his plate. Fortunately, for us, his plans have accorded priority to infrastructure and while public spending is leading the way, the private sector is preparing to jump in the fray too. Recently, at a private charity function, I bumped into Sajjan Jindal, Chairman of JSW Group, and when I posed him a casual question on whether the private sector was ready to invest into the India story: “We are getting there,” he quipped.

Set for an infra-run

Data suggests that demonetisation has hit the pace of announcement of new investment proposals during the quarter-ended December 2016

The Union Budget has set the tone for 2017 by accelerating the growth agenda. The allocation for infrastructure at Rs 3.96 lakh crore, over Rs 3.49 lakh crore last year, will fuel the sector. Of the increase of Rs 47,000 crore, transport itself will consume Rs 24,000 crore.

The Railway Budget has been the largest-ever at Rs 1.31 lakh crore – an 8.26 per cent increase over the Rs 1.21 lakh crore allocated in 2016-17. Railway lines of 3,500 km will be commissioned in 2017-18 while at least 25 stations are expected to be awarded during 2017-18 for station redevelopment. Allocation for highways has been increased from Rs 57,976 crore in 2016-17 to Rs 64,900 crore in 2017-18. Around 2,000 km of coastal connectivity roads have been identified for construction and development.

The dark horse in the transport sector, the Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojana (PMGSY) has gathered pace. Last year, when I asked Minister Nitin Gadkari at a CII meet, why the PMGSY programme, which had tremendous potential, was not going anywhere – he responded that it did not fall under his ministry but that the government was working on an impetus for it.

The pace of construction of PMGSY roads has accelerated to reach 133 km per day in 2016-17, as against an average of 73 km during the period 2011-2014. And, the Budget has continued to provide Rs 19,000 crore in 2017-18 for this scheme. Together with the contribution of States, an amount of Rs 27,000 crore will be spent on PMGSY in 2017-18.

The other big bang boost has been for the housing sector. National Housing Bank will refinance individual housing loans of about Rs 20,000 crore in 2017-18. Affordable housing has been given the ´infrastructure´ status, which will enable these projects to avail benefits including interest subvention. Further, a target to complete 1 crore houses by 2019 has been set for the homeless and those living in kutcha houses.

Allocation for Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (PMAY) has been raised from Rs 20,000 crore in 2016-17 to Rs 29,000 crore in 2017-18. Owing to these reforms, there is a likelihood of an ample availability of affordable housing in the next three years.

Among other infrastructure projects, the Metro projects will see the introduction of a Metro Policy and higher allocation of Rs 18,000 crore, against Rs 10,000 crore in the previous year. AMRUT and the Smart Cities mission will continue to move forward with an allocation of Rs 9,000 crore, against Rs 7,296 crore, as 60 selected cities gear up to issue tenders for city development.

The Namami Gange project has been allocated an increase of Rs 100 crore from Rs 2,150 crore to Rs 2,250 crore. And, Sagarmala has received an enhanced allocation of Rs 150 crore from Rs 450 to 600 crore. The Swachh Bharat campaign is being vigorously run and the allocation has risen to Rs 16,000 crore. Armed with the demonetisation swell in the banks, the finance minister had some head room to hold back the temptation of hiking the service tax in view of the forthcoming Goods and Service Tax (GST), which was a big relief. Further, though the large corporate sector did not get the tax reduction, the FM reduced taxes by 5 per cent for the MSMEs, which have an annual turnover of Rs 50 crore or less, thereby benefitting nearly 64 lakh companies.

Issues that need further attention by the ministry include implementation of the projects. Even the irrigation projects, which found mention in his last year´s Budget speech where 23 of the 99 projects would require to be completed by March 2017, are likely to miss the deadline. As per CMIE, new investment proposals worth Rs 1.25 lakh crore were observed during the quarter ended December 2016. This is low compared to the average Rs 2.36 lakh crore worth of new investments seen per quarter in the preceding nine quarters of the Modi Government. Data suggests that demonetisation has hit the pace of announcement of new investment proposals during the quarter-ended December 2016. Two hundred and twenty seven new investment proposals worth Rs 81,800 crore were announced during this quarter till November 8, 2016. In comparison, only 177 investment proposals worth Rs 43,700 crore were made between November 9 and December 31, 2016.

As for stalled projects, though the current government was to invigorate the economy by debottlenecking and accelerating these, the data points to the contrary. CMIE capex figures show that year-end stalled project figures for 2016 are at their highest levels since December 1995. The total value of stalled projects has reached Rs 11.70 lakh crore in the December quarter, accounting for 12.11 per cent of the total projects under implementation. Among the prime reasons for which the projects are stalled, ´obstacles in environment clearances´ contribute to 20 per cent while ´lack of promoter interest´ seems to be a growing trend over ´land acquisition issues´.

However, the absolute value of new project announcements shows that 2016 ranks second best among the last five years. This means that but for demonetisation, the economy was set for a run. Even if we examine the performance for the road sector, the contracts awarded and the length of roads constructed in the highway sector has been way behind claims of the road ministry.

The status of construction awarded and completed during September 2016 vis-a-vis targets set forth for 2016-17 are as follows:
However, the stage is set for a revival of the tempo. The Dispute Resolution Bill, release of funds for cases stuck in arbitration, reduction in interest rates, resolution of some severely stuck road projects, consolidation of some road assets and the infusion of some foreign capital, which has come to the rescue for some developers – all has signaled the dawn of the good times by Diwali 2016. And now, with the demonetisation impact easing up, the delayed dawn of good times is on the horizon again.

Can the Budget bring the mojo back?

Demonetisation has dealt a body blow to the economy whether we like it or not. It has delayed the uptick in the economy by a minimum of several quarters. The informal economy is in tatters and the business outlook is glum.

But it is done and nothing can be done about it. Building a cashless economy is a long-term goal but given the fillip provided owing to the diktat, digital payments and the infrastructure required for their enablement are set to leapfrog.

The argument that the informal economy can become part of the formal economy by such legal leverage is flawed. On the contrary, when the fruits of development ripen under the formal economy, they beckon with sweet dividends. But this, too, is more likely to happen provided the formal economy offers infrastructure to enable ´ease of doing business´. Currently, the formal economy is low down in the rankings globally and has barely moved up a notch despite fervent campaigns trying to create a favourable pitch for the same.

The reason it is not being reflected is because the constituents, like the legal system for enforcing contracts, resolving insolvency, obtaining construction permits, are not tuned in to this level of efficiency. They need overhauling. The Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code 2016 has just got notified and has been activated in the last quarter. But why are we ranked 172nd in paying taxes? If we want more and more tax payers, the process should be made payer-friendly and easy to comprehend and observe. Disillusionment with the formal economy will always encourage new entrants to find easier, unlawful ways of avoiding taxes. Starting a business, too, is a difficult proposition. Then, how can we create and harness young talent, which is the true demographic dividend? Thus, only when the states make it easy to do business will the informal economy take lessons in joining the formal economy.

For instance, dealing with construction permits is a nightmare. State governments need to bring down the number of permits and arrive at a one-window solution. The Model Building Bylaws introduced earlier this year provide a framework for online approvals for building and construction projects in urban areas, including simplified environmental and other clearances within 30 days, and encourage self-declaration. Similarly, various states need to adopt the Real-Estate Regulation Act to make the shift. Here, the act has stiffened penalties for the developers, but has kept no onus of delay in permissions on the authorities, leaving the developer exposed to the mercy of the authorities.

Meanwhile, roads need to step up the acceleration. Up to November, the total length of road contracts awarded has been 5,688 km and the length of roads constructed 4,021 km, which is 12 km per day.

A huge development in the Northeast under NHIDCL is underway, covering a length of 8,007 km to be executed at about Rs 100,000 crore. And, in urban infrastructure, from January to December 2016, a total investment of Rs 272,380 crore has been approved for the smart city plans of 60 cities, AMRUT, PMAY (Urban), new metro projects, Swachh Bharat Mission (Urban), and redevelopment of seven Central Government residential colonies in New Delhi.

Public spending will need to further be stepped up to create employment opportunities for the informal sector. The Budget is expected to reduce taxes, offer incentives for using digital payments and announce major initiatives in public spending. The growth momentum had just about begun to accelerate when November 8 struck. Now, that mojo seems elusive. Can the Budget bring it back?

PS: The Union Budget is scheduled on 1st February, a big change in practice followed ever since we became independent. Construction World too is making a big change. Watch out for the February issue!

Set for growth

Last month, in a swift move at the recommendation of  NITI Aayog, the government reversed the misery of construction and infrastructure companies. In this column last month, I had pitched for a resolution to the impasse on matters stuck in arbitration, disputes and appeals. So while the ruling has now provided that the company in question is not squeezed to death of its finances and left to dry, and this takes care of the financial disease such companies come down with, the core attitudinal shift causing this legal pileup has not been addressed.

That said, the ruling has led to the rerating of construction and infrastructure stocks at the bourses. Companies planning InvITs will see better valuations. Huge funds are likely to come back into the system to companies like HCC, Patel Engineering, Sadbhav, IRB, etc. While this augurs well for equipment companies, there is also likely to be a shift in the list of bidders for EPC and hybrid annuity contracts issued by MoRTH
and NHAI.

Meanwhile, real-estate companies are experiencing rough weather as the consumer protection movement is gaining momentum. Several companies like Unitech, Supertech and Parsvanath have been instructed by courts to return the money invested by those who have booked flats where either the companies have not presented a ´true and fair´ picture of the offering when they raised investments from buyers or violated deadlines for delivery. The Real Estate Regulation Act (RERA) has sent a shiver down the spines of developers as rulings have begun to send developer after developer behind bars for violations and misrepresentations, non-delivery and unfair practices. Consolidation is already in progress in this sector as several stressed developers have made alliances with financially stronger partners to bail them out. Ajay Piramal´s real-estate fund initiatives have rescued many of them too. New money is coming in under changed conditions seeking fresh rules for play.

The Smart Cities mission has released 27 additional cities, taking the total number of cities selected under the mission to 60. The new cities are from 12 states and have proposed to invest a total of Rs 66,883 crore under their respective city development plans. The amount includes Rs 42,524 crore in area-based development (79 per cent of the total) and Rs 11,379 crore (21 per cent) in technology-based pan-city solutions. With this, the total investment proposed for the 60 cities selected has now gone up to Rs 144,742 crore. Several of these cities are now readying DPRs; RFPs for some projects have already been readied and launched by Pune, Jaipur, Ahmedabad, etc. Another Rs 45,935 crore has been approved by the Ministry of Urban Development under the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT). In addition to 68 projects launched in 14 smart cities this June, another 134 projects have been identified, of which 114 are under bidding. The pace of urban renewal has been stepped up under these initiatives and is likely to accelerate in the coming year.

Growth has been initiated by eliminating bottlenecks and making structural changes. Liquidity released through the Pay Commission, OROP and government spending will add to the buoyancy likely to emerge as a result of the above normal monsoon, which will hopefully provide a bountiful harvest in the coming season. Obstacles are being eased with the initiatives enumerated above and the scenario is set for a revival. It indeed augurs well for the festive season ahead  Happy Diwali!

Modi 2.0

Never before have the rains mattered so much for the corporate sector as this year -despite all the efforts of a hard working government that has just completed two years. There is no doubt that in these two years, wastage has been targeted and reduced (Rs 36,000 crore saved in leakages). Natural resources like coal and gas have been protected and leveraged in a transparent and efficient manner (the savings through reduction in imports in coal last year saved the country Rs 24,000 crore in foreign exchange). The rightful recipients have been provided the subsidies meant for them. Corruption has been checked. Faith in the administration has begun to be restored.

Considering that we have budgeted Rs 205,000 crore for food and fertiliser schemes for FY17, plus pending bills of over Rs 100,000 crore, the Direct Benefit Transfer schemes will save crores of resources. Just knowing that our revenues are being administered restores a sense of assurance.

While there are plenty of welfare schemes that are being monitored both by the PM´s PRAGATI mechanism (the ICT-based, multi-modal platform for Pro-Active Governance and Timely Implementation) and the opposition, the infrastructure projects initiated by the Centre and states too are under observation. Road projects have taken the lead with 90 per cent of 380 delayed projects worth Rs 3.50 lakh crore taking off. Port projects worth Rs 70,000 crore have been planned and inland water projects are likely to see some traction with the Rs 4,000-crore Haldia waterway project getting the green signal. Railways have stepped up the budget by 100 per cent to Rs 93,975 crore and decision making has been accelerated while political exploitation of this ministry has ended. The Power Ministry has put the sale of LED on fire (sale of LED has increased from 6 lakh annually to 6 lakh per day). The UDAY scheme is aimed at restoring financial viability to the sector (the discom sector is sitting on a loss of Rs 3.20 crore) and several states have joined the scheme. The Urban Development Ministry has brought in the Real-Estate Regulation Act, the model building bylaws, the Smart Cities mission and the AMRUT mission initiating urban renewal reform. The missions are on track and are likely to see tenders being issued by the third quarter of the current financial year.

The Bankruptcy Code has been passed and ´Ease of Doing Business´ has gained momentum with states going on overdrive in terms of reducing the number of formalities hindering quicker registration processes.

The PM´s overseas travel has helped the renewed India brand get recognised at a time when we are the bright spot in economic growth among all countries and a record foreign direct investment (FDI) of $55.4 billion was received during financial year ended 2015-16. The entire effort to reduce leakages and corruption and get the government administration to work efficiently to deliver results has yet to yield clearly visible results. The economy continues to be under strain and the banking sector is heavily stressed despite the godsend opportunity of savings in our oil import bill. Public spending will be required to continue to lead the economy out of the morass. With its recent victory in Assam, the Modi Government needs to step up its game and, with a good monsoon, Modi 2.0 will be off to a good start.

Smart cities: Designed for growth

June 25 will be remembered as a red-letter day in the history of urban India as three mission programmes with a huge spend were launched, all backed by India’s dynamic Prime Minister Narendra Modi: Smart Cities, AMRUT and ‘Housing for All’. The depth of these programmes can be gauged from the detailing in the guidelines and the extent of the detailed planning of the conduct of their launch. After the PM set the tone by defining a smart city as one ‘where the administration thinks two steps ahead of the needs of its citizens’, he urged the assembled urban development state ministers, mayors and municipal commissioners from across India to aspire to leave behind a legacy by which their contribution to building India’s model urban programmes would be recognised. Union Minister for Urban Development Venkaiah Naidu conducted the workshop for two full days where good work done by municipalities was presented and lauded and guidelines to the three missions were explained.
In four months, states will receive proposals from their cities that want to qualify as projects. The states will then choose from among the selected cities from the list, and propose them as their entry to the Smart Cities Mission. It is likely that by March 2016, 20 cities will qualify for funding under the mission. These cities will receive Rs 200 crore in the first year and Rs 100 crore during the next four years. The cities will have to observe certain criteria, which include proposals for retrofitting with 500 acre or redevelopment with 50 acre or greenfield with 250 acre plus a pan-city smart solution initiative that has received the support of citizen groups. Further, they need to ensure that 10 per cent of power is sourced from renewables in case of greenfield development or redevelopment; 80 per cent of the buildings have to be energy-efficient; and 15 per cent of total housing provided needs to fall under affordable housing. The Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) have to provide financial statements for the past two years and demonstrate improvements as per the Swachh Bharat Mission and revenue generations from citizens through provision of services. All this is bound to gear ULBs up for accountability and good governance. As all procurements will take place through e-procurement measures, corruption will be minimised.
The Smart Cities Mission along with AMRUT, Housing for All, Digital India, Swachh Bharat and HRIDAY will see a total spend of Rs 4 lakh crore over the next five years. All these missions are integrated and interrelated. The essential change in these schemes over the past has been that the Centre has passed down the responsibilities of city improvement to the state. Introducing a challenge has added an element of competition. Once the ‘smarter’ states win funding for their cities, private sector money a.k.a. builders will flow in, leaving some in the lurch. Once money starts taking sides, city leaders will compete. This opens up opportunities for PPP as nearly 50 per cent of the money for the cities will have to be generated by attracting the interest of private developers. The Housing for All’ scheme will accelerate ‘in-situ’ slum redevelopment projects as it offers an incentive of Rs 1 lakh per 30 sq m flat built to developers. Housing loans of up to Rs 6 lakh for a 15-year period at an interest rate of only 6.5 per cent is being issued to economically weaker segments of society to acquire a home.
The affordable housing segment is likely to continue to be the only beacon of light for the debt-ridden realty sector. On a similar note, the roads sector has been green lit and the PM is likely to trigger a wave in July. Government expenditure is slated to rise with a major bump in September to come from the additional amount of Rs 70,000 crore set aside for infrastructure. Last month, this column had wished away the dark clouds of despair (‘Bure din gaye’). By September, we are likely to see the first crack of dawn of ‘Acche din’!