Post the earthquake, Turkey cracks down on contractors and developers
Real Estate

Post the earthquake, Turkey cracks down on contractors and developers

Several property developers have been detained or arrested by Turkish authorities as the death toll from the devastating earthquake last week climbed above 36,000. According to the Turkish Emergency Coordination Center SAKOM , the 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck southeastern Turkey near the border with Syria has now claimed the lives of 31,643 people in Turkey. State media reported on Sunday that 4,574 people have died in Syria.

The earthquake has turned out to be Turkey's deadliest earthquake since 1939 which killed 32,962 people. Turkey's residents have been trapped beneath the rubble, and emergency responders have been frantically trying to reach them. Resentment has increased among those impacted by the loss of loved ones, and many are now seeking to assign blame for the extent of the disaster.

While attempting to leave the country on Sunday, several contractors who officials believed were responsible for several destroyed buildings in the city were apprehended at Istanbul airport. Construction standards and building regulations in Turkey are receiving increased scrutiny, which coincides with the clampdown on contractors. Due to Turkey's location on multiple tectonic plates, earthquakes are common. However, the quake that occurred last week was “worst event in 100 years in this region".

Building codes were tightened after previous disasters, which should have ensured that modern structures could withstand significant tremors. However, it appeared as though many of the destroyed buildings in the affected area were brand-new. Experts and residents are now questioning whether the government failed to enforce building regulations. Experts also say that contractors wouldn't have been able to move forward with their projects if a number of local officials might have approved their subpar work and said corruption was to blame.

After the devastating Izmit earthquake in the Marmara region in 1999, which killed more than 17,000 people and left about half a million homeless, the country has strict regulations. Contractors' detentions are being viewed by many as an attempt by the government to shift blame for the disaster's scope from the state to individuals.

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Several property developers have been detained or arrested by Turkish authorities as the death toll from the devastating earthquake last week climbed above 36,000. According to the Turkish Emergency Coordination Center SAKOM , the 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck southeastern Turkey near the border with Syria has now claimed the lives of 31,643 people in Turkey. State media reported on Sunday that 4,574 people have died in Syria. The earthquake has turned out to be Turkey's deadliest earthquake since 1939 which killed 32,962 people. Turkey's residents have been trapped beneath the rubble, and emergency responders have been frantically trying to reach them. Resentment has increased among those impacted by the loss of loved ones, and many are now seeking to assign blame for the extent of the disaster. While attempting to leave the country on Sunday, several contractors who officials believed were responsible for several destroyed buildings in the city were apprehended at Istanbul airport. Construction standards and building regulations in Turkey are receiving increased scrutiny, which coincides with the clampdown on contractors. Due to Turkey's location on multiple tectonic plates, earthquakes are common. However, the quake that occurred last week was “worst event in 100 years in this region. Building codes were tightened after previous disasters, which should have ensured that modern structures could withstand significant tremors. However, it appeared as though many of the destroyed buildings in the affected area were brand-new. Experts and residents are now questioning whether the government failed to enforce building regulations. Experts also say that contractors wouldn't have been able to move forward with their projects if a number of local officials might have approved their subpar work and said corruption was to blame. After the devastating Izmit earthquake in the Marmara region in 1999, which killed more than 17,000 people and left about half a million homeless, the country has strict regulations. Contractors' detentions are being viewed by many as an attempt by the government to shift blame for the disaster's scope from the state to individuals.

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