The evolution of Doors and Windows
Doors & Windows

The evolution of Doors and Windows

Gone are the days when doors and windows were limited to a simple amalgamation of wood and frost glass. From standardised versions that bedeck high-rises draped in showy facades to customised offerings crafted to gratify individual tastes, they come in a host of materials and have become agents of wellness, energy-efficiency and sustainability.

Windows and doors are important components of any building and have a significant influence on both the interiors and exteriors. They not only affect the overall look and feel but also play an important purpose in ensuring the security and utility of the space. The material, colour and pattern of the doors and windows have a massive impact on how the space appears and feels. The ongoing evolution of trends and styles has led to many appealing, affordable and energy-efficient fenestration solutions.

In the pre-high-rise era, too, there was a demand for beautiful doors and windows. Heritage and traditional Indian structures serve as testament to this. We must also take note of the colonial structures and buildings modelled on the lines of 19th century architecture that continue to grace our cities. In such properties, solutions need to be in sync with the original design.

“Casement windows and doors made of repurposed wood or responsibly grown wood are still a good option for such homes and buildings,” says Niraj Doshi,Principal Architect, Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy. “With good rubber and silicon seals, they can be weatherproofed as well. You can also include double glazing in the windows.”

Wood continues to remain a favourite in such properties but uPVC has made inroads too. “The traditional aesthetic is as popular as ever, in a modern or traditional home,” says Khozema Chitalwala, Principal Architect, Designers Group. “These days, heritage windows made of uPVC look indistinguishable and are available in flush sash and storm-proof variants. The flush version has a smooth and sleek frame that mimics the design of 19thcentury windows. The storm-proof glass offers extensive protection from the elements. Traditional joinery techniques are applied and each joint is handcrafted for a one-of-a-kind look. Unlike timber, uPVC doesn't often need repainting, the colour doesn't fade, and it is a more cost-effective solution.”

By the time our buildings grew in height, the methods of building and constructing them also changed and factors like energy-efficiency and HVAC came into play.

As doors and windows act as agents of ventilation, their impact on air quality has been a subject of constant debate.

To read the full interview, CLICK HERE.

Gone are the days when doors and windows were limited to a simple amalgamation of wood and frost glass. From standardised versions that bedeck high-rises draped in showy facades to customised offerings crafted to gratify individual tastes, they come in a host of materials and have become agents of wellness, energy-efficiency and sustainability. Windows and doors are important components of any building and have a significant influence on both the interiors and exteriors. They not only affect the overall look and feel but also play an important purpose in ensuring the security and utility of the space. The material, colour and pattern of the doors and windows have a massive impact on how the space appears and feels. The ongoing evolution of trends and styles has led to many appealing, affordable and energy-efficient fenestration solutions. In the pre-high-rise era, too, there was a demand for beautiful doors and windows. Heritage and traditional Indian structures serve as testament to this. We must also take note of the colonial structures and buildings modelled on the lines of 19th century architecture that continue to grace our cities. In such properties, solutions need to be in sync with the original design. “Casement windows and doors made of repurposed wood or responsibly grown wood are still a good option for such homes and buildings,” says Niraj Doshi,Principal Architect, Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy. “With good rubber and silicon seals, they can be weatherproofed as well. You can also include double glazing in the windows.” Wood continues to remain a favourite in such properties but uPVC has made inroads too. “The traditional aesthetic is as popular as ever, in a modern or traditional home,” says Khozema Chitalwala, Principal Architect, Designers Group. “These days, heritage windows made of uPVC look indistinguishable and are available in flush sash and storm-proof variants. The flush version has a smooth and sleek frame that mimics the design of 19thcentury windows. The storm-proof glass offers extensive protection from the elements. Traditional joinery techniques are applied and each joint is handcrafted for a one-of-a-kind look. Unlike timber, uPVC doesn't often need repainting, the colour doesn't fade, and it is a more cost-effective solution.” By the time our buildings grew in height, the methods of building and constructing them also changed and factors like energy-efficiency and HVAC came into play. As doors and windows act as agents of ventilation, their impact on air quality has been a subject of constant debate. To read the full interview, CLICK HERE.

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