AAI: Indigo uses new satellite-based tech to land passenger aircraft
AVIATION & AIRPORTS

AAI: Indigo uses new satellite-based tech to land passenger aircraft

The Airports Authority of India (AAI) completed a trial at the Kishangarh airport in Rajasthan, using the newest technology produced by an indigenous satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) named GAGAN (GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation).

India is the first country in the Asia Pacific to do this.

The airport tested GAGAN (GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation) based Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance LPV approach techniques.

The tests were carried out with the assistance of the DGCA team. According to media sources, this innovative technology delivers a significant operating boost in severe weather and limited visibility circumstances.

GAGAN is a space-based augmented navigation system developed collaboratively by AAI and ISRO in India.

It is the first system of its kind devised for India and its tropical neighbours. It assists natural catastrophes such as floods and earthquakes by delivering messages to those who are impacted.

According to the ministry of civil aviation, the IndiGo aircraft used GAGAN Service to fly an aircraft using an Instrument Approach Procedure (IAP) with an LPV minimum of 250ft.

In bad weather and low visibility, the choice to drop the height to 250 feet gives a significant operating benefit.

The government's announcement revealed that the new technology would help in the landing of aeroplanes in rural airports.

As a result, any airport that previously required greater visibility minimums would be able to accept aircraft that benefit distant airports that lack precision approach capability equipment.

It is a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) developed in collaboration with the Indian Airport Authority (AAI).

GAGAN's major goals are to deliver accurate and reliable satellite-based navigation systems for civil aviation applications, along with improve air traffic management in Indian airspace.

The system will be compatible with other worldwide SBAS systems and would allow for smooth navigation across regional borders. GSAT-8 and GSAT-10 provide access to the GAGAN Signal-In-Space (SIS).

Image Source

Also read:Civil Aviation ministry to develop 21 greenfield airports in India

The Airports Authority of India (AAI) completed a trial at the Kishangarh airport in Rajasthan, using the newest technology produced by an indigenous satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) named GAGAN (GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation). India is the first country in the Asia Pacific to do this. The airport tested GAGAN (GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation) based Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance LPV approach techniques. The tests were carried out with the assistance of the DGCA team. According to media sources, this innovative technology delivers a significant operating boost in severe weather and limited visibility circumstances. GAGAN is a space-based augmented navigation system developed collaboratively by AAI and ISRO in India. It is the first system of its kind devised for India and its tropical neighbours. It assists natural catastrophes such as floods and earthquakes by delivering messages to those who are impacted. According to the ministry of civil aviation, the IndiGo aircraft used GAGAN Service to fly an aircraft using an Instrument Approach Procedure (IAP) with an LPV minimum of 250ft. In bad weather and low visibility, the choice to drop the height to 250 feet gives a significant operating benefit. The government's announcement revealed that the new technology would help in the landing of aeroplanes in rural airports. As a result, any airport that previously required greater visibility minimums would be able to accept aircraft that benefit distant airports that lack precision approach capability equipment. It is a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) developed in collaboration with the Indian Airport Authority (AAI). GAGAN's major goals are to deliver accurate and reliable satellite-based navigation systems for civil aviation applications, along with improve air traffic management in Indian airspace. The system will be compatible with other worldwide SBAS systems and would allow for smooth navigation across regional borders. GSAT-8 and GSAT-10 provide access to the GAGAN Signal-In-Space (SIS). Image Source Also read:Civil Aviation ministry to develop 21 greenfield airports in India

Related Stories

Gold Stories

Hi There!

Now get regular updates from CW Magazine on WhatsApp!

Click on link below, message us with a simple hi, and SAVE our number

You will have subscribed to our Construction News on Whatsapp! Enjoy

+91 86574 75330

Join us Telegram

Reach out to us

Call us at +91 8108603000 or

Schedule a Call Back