Cement and concrete makers target net zero emissions by 2050
Cement

Cement and concrete makers target net zero emissions by 2050

Global cement and concrete producers laid out steps to decrease carbon dioxide emissions by 25% by 2030 and attain zero net emissions by mid-century, depending on more carbon-free energy, new chemistry and production technology, and carbon capture.

Cement, the glue of concrete, values around 7% of global carbon emissions and the Global Cement and Concrete Association (GCCA) estimates 80% of concrete made outside of China and some firms within China.

The United Nations COP26 climate conference next month is pushing many firms to make emissions commitments. The GCCA targets to meet the earlier declared aim of net-zero emissions by 2050 did not lay out prices or cut down how much each step would decrease emissions.

The plan involves finding and substituting more options to clinker, a binder of cement, more usage of alternative fuels, new chemistry and production processes, carbon capture and storage, enhanced efficiency in concrete use and urging governments to support new forms of concrete and purchase them.

GCCA Chief Executive Thomas Guillot told the media that 10 industrial-scale carbon-capture plants pledged in its roadmap by 2030 would be constructed and paid for by members.

Industry experts have indicated major difficulties around getting extensively unavailable carbon-capture technology up to pace by 2050, comprising regulatory issues, safety concerns, cost and public acceptance.

Guillot noticed the difficulties but said that the members were having talks with governments and regulators, while the GCCA had taken the matter up with international bodies. Those discussions also involved carbon pricing.

In 10 years, they need to prove not only the technical feasibility but also the economic feasibility of carbon capture.

Jeffrey Rissman, Industry Program Director at California-based Energy Innovation, told the media that the blueprint from the GCCA was surprisingly large, praising ideas for clinker substitution and the use of alternative fuels. But he cautioned that burning plastic waste as an energy source would not stop CO2 from getting into the atmosphere.

Mexico's Cemex, a GCCA member and North America's biggest concrete producer, told the media that it was asking for government assistance for its carbon capture plans.

Most of these pilot projects will commence works between 2023 and 2024. All those that prove to be on the right path will go into the next stage for increasing them.

Image Source


Also read: Blended cement: A step towards CO2 reduction

Global cement and concrete producers laid out steps to decrease carbon dioxide emissions by 25% by 2030 and attain zero net emissions by mid-century, depending on more carbon-free energy, new chemistry and production technology, and carbon capture. Cement, the glue of concrete, values around 7% of global carbon emissions and the Global Cement and Concrete Association (GCCA) estimates 80% of concrete made outside of China and some firms within China. The United Nations COP26 climate conference next month is pushing many firms to make emissions commitments. The GCCA targets to meet the earlier declared aim of net-zero emissions by 2050 did not lay out prices or cut down how much each step would decrease emissions. The plan involves finding and substituting more options to clinker, a binder of cement, more usage of alternative fuels, new chemistry and production processes, carbon capture and storage, enhanced efficiency in concrete use and urging governments to support new forms of concrete and purchase them. GCCA Chief Executive Thomas Guillot told the media that 10 industrial-scale carbon-capture plants pledged in its roadmap by 2030 would be constructed and paid for by members. Industry experts have indicated major difficulties around getting extensively unavailable carbon-capture technology up to pace by 2050, comprising regulatory issues, safety concerns, cost and public acceptance. Guillot noticed the difficulties but said that the members were having talks with governments and regulators, while the GCCA had taken the matter up with international bodies. Those discussions also involved carbon pricing. In 10 years, they need to prove not only the technical feasibility but also the economic feasibility of carbon capture. Jeffrey Rissman, Industry Program Director at California-based Energy Innovation, told the media that the blueprint from the GCCA was surprisingly large, praising ideas for clinker substitution and the use of alternative fuels. But he cautioned that burning plastic waste as an energy source would not stop CO2 from getting into the atmosphere. Mexico's Cemex, a GCCA member and North America's biggest concrete producer, told the media that it was asking for government assistance for its carbon capture plans. Most of these pilot projects will commence works between 2023 and 2024. All those that prove to be on the right path will go into the next stage for increasing them. Image SourceAlso read: Blended cement: A step towards CO2 reduction

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