How COVID pushed the home improvement industry to go online
Interiors

How COVID pushed the home improvement industry to go online

The house remodelling and design industry, more than any other, was completely altered by the COVID-19 epidemic. Commuters who had previously spent the most of their days at an office now found themselves confined to homes and apartments that were not necessarily equipped for work, resulting in an inflow of new business and new needs for home renovation contractors.

The importance of functionality was paramount. Backyards were transformed into gyms, while closets and kitchen tables were transformed into workplaces. "People had great expectations of how you'd use every square inch of your house to satisfy all of these new wants," Tatarko said. "That produced a lot of worry, and with that came a lot of expectations [for the design profession] about how we'd manage it."

She went on to say that the impact on contractors and professionals was immediate. "At the start of the epidemic, experts were like, 'Whoa.' How can we possibly get access to people's houses when everyone is seeking refuge elsewhere in the world? Because they were striving to aid as many people as possible, they were busy than before."

Houzz was in a great position to fill in the blanks. The network included 65 million homes and 2.7 million professionals just before the pandemic. According to Tatarko, a notable shift in consumer demands was already taking place. "We've already seen some shifts as everyone moves to the digital realm—increased demands from homeowners for various professional services, to do it more online, and to give them with software, tools, visibility, and transparency."

Simultaneously, a big number of baby boomers were refurbishing their homes, and there was already a housing crisis. Then came the pandemic, which Tatarko believes was the catalyst for the industry's definitive shift toward technology use.

The home renovation industry's growing dependence on technology, according to Tatarko, is here to stay. Professionals were busier as a result of increased access to technology (which wasn't the case 10 or 20 years ago, she points out), as well as the unexpected high demand caused by COVID. "Beyond their initial network, their world of possible, relevant, high-intent clients dramatically shifted." "Tatarko said. "Who they can establish brands in front of has altered, as has the way they can serve these clients. I believe that if you provide them the correct tools and technology, they will have a strong desire and demand."

Also read
https://www.constructionworld.in/latest-construction-news/real-estate-news/interiors/bangalore-based-interior-designer-launches-design-offerings/31266
https://www.constructionworld.in/latest-construction-news/real-estate-news/interiors/west-elm-enters-india--partners-with-reliance-brands-to-launch-stores/31127

The house remodelling and design industry, more than any other, was completely altered by the COVID-19 epidemic. Commuters who had previously spent the most of their days at an office now found themselves confined to homes and apartments that were not necessarily equipped for work, resulting in an inflow of new business and new needs for home renovation contractors. The importance of functionality was paramount. Backyards were transformed into gyms, while closets and kitchen tables were transformed into workplaces. People had great expectations of how you'd use every square inch of your house to satisfy all of these new wants, Tatarko said. That produced a lot of worry, and with that came a lot of expectations [for the design profession] about how we'd manage it. She went on to say that the impact on contractors and professionals was immediate. At the start of the epidemic, experts were like, 'Whoa.' How can we possibly get access to people's houses when everyone is seeking refuge elsewhere in the world? Because they were striving to aid as many people as possible, they were busy than before. Houzz was in a great position to fill in the blanks. The network included 65 million homes and 2.7 million professionals just before the pandemic. According to Tatarko, a notable shift in consumer demands was already taking place. We've already seen some shifts as everyone moves to the digital realm—increased demands from homeowners for various professional services, to do it more online, and to give them with software, tools, visibility, and transparency. Simultaneously, a big number of baby boomers were refurbishing their homes, and there was already a housing crisis. Then came the pandemic, which Tatarko believes was the catalyst for the industry's definitive shift toward technology use. The home renovation industry's growing dependence on technology, according to Tatarko, is here to stay. Professionals were busier as a result of increased access to technology (which wasn't the case 10 or 20 years ago, she points out), as well as the unexpected high demand caused by COVID. Beyond their initial network, their world of possible, relevant, high-intent clients dramatically shifted. Tatarko said. Who they can establish brands in front of has altered, as has the way they can serve these clients. I believe that if you provide them the correct tools and technology, they will have a strong desire and demand.Also read https://www.constructionworld.in/latest-construction-news/real-estate-news/interiors/bangalore-based-interior-designer-launches-design-offerings/31266 https://www.constructionworld.in/latest-construction-news/real-estate-news/interiors/west-elm-enters-india--partners-with-reliance-brands-to-launch-stores/31127

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